English 004 (Lorette): Dystopian/Utopian Novels: Search Terms

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Below are the official Library of Congress Subject Headings you may want to use.

 

 

Dystopias

Dystopias in Literature

Science Fiction

Fantasy Fiction

Speculative Fiction

Utopias

Dystopian Films

Totalitarianism

Fascism

Discrimination

Alienation (Social Psychology)

Authoritarianism

 

 

 

 

Obedience

Compliance

Authority

Authority Abuse

Power (Philosophy)

Mind Control

Control (Psychology)

Brainwash*

Abusive

Controlling

Charisma

Cult of personality

SOCIAL influence

Psychological Aspects

Torture

Conformity

Civil Disobedience

Resistance to Government

Dissenters

Protest Movements

Riots

 

 

Future evolution

Future  

Futurology

Future Studies

Human Beings-Forecasting

 

Cybernetics

Cyborgs 

Human-machine systems

Man-Machine Systems

 

 

 

Genetic Engineering

Genetics

Cloning

Technology=-Social Aspects

.

 

 

Keywords

While not official subject headings, these keywords can be very fruitful for your research. Try to also think of other terms such as these. Keyword searches look at all the information in the book or article record including title, author, abstract, table of contents, etc. It always helps to think of synonyms, as the way one person would describe something is not the same way another would.

1984

Dystopian Novels

 

 

 

What "Search Terms" to Use?

Using the correct words to search will help you find relevant information. Different authors and search tools use different words to describe the same concepts, so it is useful to have a list of similar and related terms in your arsenal when you set out to search for relevant information. The process of creating these alternative terms is called brainstorming terms or concept mapping.

EXAMPLE

 Octavia Butler AND Dystopia

What "search terms" to use?

Using the correct words to search will help you find relevant information. Different authors and search tools use different words to describe the same concepts, so it is useful to have a list of similar and related terms in your arsenal when you set out to search for relevant information. The process of creating these alternative terms is called brainstorming terms or concept mapping.

EXAMPLE

Sex Differences AND Communication


If for some reason, you are getting results you do NOT want (say for example you want to find only articles on communication in opposite sex marriages) try a NOT search.  Librarians caution that NOT searches often also weed out articles that may have been relevant for you.  So only perform such searches if you have LOTS of results (say over ten that are in full text format):

EXAMPLE

Marriage NOT Same Sex