English 048 (Rajaram) Holocaust (Matthews): Subject terms

Definition

Winston Churchill described the mass murder of European Jewry by Nazi Germany and its allies as “a crime without a name.” The perpetrators, the National Socialist (Nazi) regime in Germany called it Die Endlösung der Judenfrage (the Final Solution of the Jewish Question). The number of Jewish victims is generally regarded to be between 5.8 and 6 million. Later, this extermination policy became known as the Holocaust, or “Shoah” in Hebrew. In a more generic and legalistic formula, the Holocaust was an example of genocide, a word invented by Raphael Lemkin in 1943. The word holocaust is derived from the Greek holokaustos, meaning a “burnt offering,” as used in a religious sacrifice.

"Holocaust." Encyclopedia of Race and Racism, edited by John Hartwell Moore, vol. 2, Macmillan Reference USA, 2008, pp. 103-112. Gale Virtual Reference Library, chabotcollege.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=ccl_ebook&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CCX2831200202&asid=a8044df8a869320319b5d6ea686ee132. Accessed 20 Nov. 2017.

The term genocide was coined in the 1940s to describe the policies of human extermination carried out by the Nazi Party during World War II (1939–1945). According to the United Nations (UN) Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (1948), the term refers to any attempt to destroy a national, ethnic, racial, or religious group via murder, bodily or mental harm, exposure to conditions likely to cause death, birth prevention, or forced transfer of children to a different group of people.

Eichenwald, Adam. "Genocide." Immigration and Migration: In Context, edited by Thomas Riggs and Kathleen J. Edgar, vol. 1, Gale, 2018, pp. 323-329. In Context Series. Gale Virtual Reference Library, chabotcollege.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=ccl_ebook&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CCX3662200071&asid=bdc02f1cd08c6c121a902fa5763bb70f. Accessed 20 Nov. 2017.

Possible Topics

  • Current examples of genocide in the world

  • Rehabilitation after genocide

  • Psychological trauma and genocide

  • Legal developments in prosecuting acts of genocide

  • Reconciliation post-genocide

  • Artists responding to genocide

RESTORATIVE justice

GENOCIDE survivors

GENOCIDE (International law)

CRIMES against humanity

Legal or law or justice or legislation

War Crime Trials or INTERNATIONAL Tribunal

PSYCHOLOGICAL aspects

Art or literature or music

Keywords

Holocaust

Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945), in literature

Concentration Camps

Death Camps

Jewish or Judaism

antisemitism

Nazi*

War crimes

Holocaust denial

ATROCITIES

Ethnic cleansing

Genocide

Atrocities

Massacres

CRIMES against humanity

Auschwitz

Dachau

Hitler, Adolf

Eichmann, Adolf

Pol Pot (Cambodia)

Rwanda

Bosnia*

Darfur

Armenia*

Assyria

Cambodia or Kampuchea

Religion

Politics

Cultur*

Ethnic

Race

Resist*

Underground movements

Psychological aspects